Sidharth Vardhan

Nietzsche’s Anti-Christ – looking too much into the abyss of Christianity

(A review by Sidharth Vardhan of Anti-Christ (1895) by Friedrich Nietzsche )   I had a liberal access to internet only when I was already in college. And I developed a very quick obsession for Wikipedia and Wikiquote surfing. When I tumbled about Nietzsche’s Wikiquote fan, I became a fan. But reading ‘beyond good and evil’ was a disappointment. All the good parts of it I had already read on his Wikiquote experience. It is as if his best always comes in aphorisms – you read Wikiquote, you can say you have read Nietzsche, well the good parts. (I felt same thing with Oscar Wilde’s plays but Wilde had non-aphorism beauty in his in non-dramtic writing). There are lots of great quotes in it, but I had already read them. They might be more of a revelation to other readers. Much of his criticism of Christianity makes sense but he seems to want to correct it by forcing opposite values on society which is where he fails. It is a popular adage that philosophers are better at asking questions than answering them. Goes for Nietzsche too. Moreover he can often be inconsistent. At one point he says Christianity has taken

Chen and Canis

(A short fiction by Sidharth Vardhan February 17, 2018) It is only because of King’s James’ personal dislike for dogs that nobody knows about Canis and Chien – for no accounts of our parents can ever be complete without mentioning them. When Adam and Eve were exiled; Canis and Chien – the first dog couple followed them, trailing not far behind them. When out of paradise, the dogs didn’t look back longingly to paradise.

On Judas and other traitors

Review of ‘Judas’ by Amos Oz First published in 2014 Short-listed for international Man-Booker in 2017 On Hurting God There must seem something paradoxical to some of the religious folks in the idea that anyone could in anyway hurt God or his relative. They thus want to argue that such people who might have done something against God were, in fact, folks who just wanted to give the God (and relations) leverage to create drama or God made them that way for drama. Many versions of Ramayana would have you believe that Ravana, in fact, was a devotee of Rama and, all he did, was to get killed from same ( talk about Machoist love!). Bible said God made Pharaoh refuses Moses’ offers so that he could bring plagues to Egypt to prove his existence (and then they blame me for creating scenes!) a Borges version said Pharaoh was intentionally serving God by refusing Moses’ offers (and letting his people suffer and die).

God’s Bread

“Only an animal worries all the time about the next meal.” – Naguib Mahfouz   1. How could he judge her? Who was he to judge her? Hadn’t she been patient enough? Mariah still remembered how she had lost her son, her only child, and it seemed to have only increased her faith – perhaps exactly because her son was taken away. Once when she was a young girl, she thought how strange faith was – the very reasons – the loss of a dear one, floods ruining everything one owns etc that should cause one to lose one’s faith often end up increasing it. Her own life had a similar trajectory – she first gave a serious thought to religion after the death of her mother who was killed by her master’s whip and by the time her father died a few days later of starvation, she was seriously religious. He had managed to marry her to John in his last days thus ensuring that she won’t be left alone.

Call Now